How to Sew a Double-Piped French Seam

Published by Naseem Muaddi on April 18th, 2017

The Hog Ring - How to Sew a Double-Piped French Seam

It’s no secret that we’re obsessed with decorative stitches. Over the years, we’ve featured some really unique ones – including the Hinge Seam, Double Topstitch and Single-Piped French Seam. Today we’re adding another to the list.

Introducing the Double-Piped French Seam! It’s unique, beautiful and – best of all – fairly simple to execute. Check out this pictorial to learn how it’s done:

Step 1. Choose material and color for piping and cut strips 1.5″ wide by the length of your panel.

The Hog Ring - How to Sew a Double-Piped French Seam

Step 2. Place the strips of material on top of each other so that their faces touch and sew a seam down the center.

Tip: To ensure a perfect seam, draw a line in the center of your upper strip and sew over top.

The Hog Ring - How to Sew a Double-Piped French Seam

Step 3. Turn the sewn strips on their side and fold the materials along the seam.

The Hog Ring - How to Sew a Double-Piped French Seam

Step 4. Insert welt piping into each fold and sew.

The Hog Ring - How to Sew a Double-Piped French Seam

The double piping should look like this:

The Hog Ring - How to Sew a Double-Piped French Seam

Step 5. Using a cord foot on your sewing machine, sew your panels onto both sides of the piping.

The Hog Ring - How to Sew a Double-Piped French Seam

Step 6. Lay down a top stitch over both sides of the piping.

The Hog Ring - How to Sew a Double-Piped French Seam

Here’s the finished product…

The Hog Ring - How to Sew a Double-Piped French Seam

And there you have it folks, a Double-Piped French Seam!

The great thing about the Double-Piped French Seam is that it affords you the ability to enhance your project by adding contrasting colors and textures. The piping, panels and thread colors can be mixed and matched in any combination you like.

Keep in mind that the Double-Piped French Seam works best in straight line applications. Attempting a curved version of the seam can be quite challenging. For that reason, and because of its excessive selvage, this seam is not well suited for the bolsters of a seat, but rather on the insert panels where it will lay properly and look its best.

Now that you know how to sew a Double-Piped French Seam, give it a try! Post your photos on Instagram and tag us or use the hashtag #TheHogRing for your chance to be featured on our site!

The Haartz Corporation


2 Responses

  1. Oliver says:

    What type of machine is being used? What are the names of the different types of feet being used in each step? I noticed that they are slightly different than the others. The only one mentioned was the welt cord foot.

    • Oliver says:

      Btw…. Great effect! I like it! And that spring loaded guide on the walking foot of the last picture!
      Consew 206rb5 is what I’m currently using and haven’t seen something like that. Very nice attachments!


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